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Every day in new zealand
a train driver suffers a near miss

Every near miss has an impact on train drivers. To remember the hundreds of near misses they witness every year, Near Miss Memorials have been installed at rail crossings as reminders to cross with care.

Jeremy, KiwiRail Locomotive Engineer

Jeremy, KiwiRail Locomotive Engineer

Jeremy, KiwiRail Locomotive Engineer

About rail safety week

Imagine being in the cab of 2,500 tonnes of steel travelling at 80km an hour when you see a figure on your track up ahead. If they don’t see your train, there’s nothing you can do to avoid hitting them. You have 8,000 horse power at your fingertips yet you’re totally powerless.

This is a feeling train drivers experience daily in New Zealand. Every near miss leaves a lasting impact on them.

This year, Rail Safety Week draws attention to the impact near misses have on train drivers by creating a lasting symbol in remembrance of every near miss. Hundreds of Near Miss Memorials are being installed at pedestrian and vehicle railway crossings around New Zealand, linked, in high pedestrian areas, to real footage of a near miss and how it affected the train driver.

WHAT IS RAIL SAFETY WEEK?
Rail Safety Week is an annual event by KiwiRail and TrackSAFE NZ, with support from NZ Police, NZ Transport Agency, Auckland Transport, Transdev Auckland, Transdev Wellington, Greater Wellington Regional Council and other councils and organisations around the country.

Rail Safety Week runs from August 12 - 18.

CONTACT OUR MEDIA TEAM:
If you have a media enquiry about Rail Safety Week 2019, please contact KiwiRail’s media team on:

04 498 2038 [email protected]

Cross with care

Cross with care

Cross with care

Trains can appear at any time, from either direction.

DRIVERS:
Take extreme care when driving over a railway level crossing.

Obey the warning signs and look carefully in both directions for trains. Listen, be aware and pay careful attention to your surroundings. Always ensure there is space on the other side of the crossing for your vehicle.

When approaching a level crossing where lights and bells are operating, or barrier arms are lowered or have started to come down,
you must:
  • Approach every rail crossing with caution.
  • Listen for warning bells.
  • Before crossing ensure there is space for your vehicle on the other side.
  • Look carefully in both directions before entering the crossing.
  • If warning lights are flashing, bells are sounding or the barrier arm is down, stop your vehicle completely and wait for the train to pass.
  • Wait for the lights to stop flashing and the barrier arms to lift before moving again.
  • At level crossings controlled by a ‘Give Way’ or ‘Stop’ sign, be prepared to stop completely and look both ways before entering.

PEDESTRIANS:
  • Only cross a railway track at a formed pedestrian crossing.
  • If wearing headphones, remove them and listen out for bells.
  • Take the time to stop fully and look both ways before entering the crossing.
  • If lights are flashing or bells are ringing this means a train is approaching.
  • If you can see a train at all, stop and wait. They appear slow but are moving very fast.


Get more safety information at tracksafe.co.nz

Other memorials

Rail Safety Week draws attention to the impact near misses have on train drivers by creating a lasting symbol in remembrance of every near miss. Hundreds of Near Miss Memorials are being installed at pedestrian and vehicle rail crossings around New Zealand, each linked to real footage of a near miss and how it affected the train driver.

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